· end of scene
· biography
· plays
· contact
· home
End Of Scene Blog Entries
SATURDAY, DEC 7, 2013
Ken makes a scene about why he wrote LIFE ON PAPER
FRIDAY, JUN 7, 2013
[EXCERPTED REVIEW] Broadway World makes a scene about Warrior Class at the Alley Theatre.
FRIDAY, JUN 7, 2013
[REVIEW] The Houston Press makes a scene about Warrior Class at the Alley Theatre.
SUNDAY, FEB 3, 2013
Ken makes a scene about an upcoming reading at Ensemble Studio Theatre
FRIDAY, FEB 1, 2013
Ken makes a scene about joining Season Two of House Of Cards
SATURDAY, DEC 8, 2012
Ken makes a scene about a letter from Liz Engelman
THURSDAY, DEC 6, 2012
Ken makes a scene about "Red State Blue State" on This American Life
MONDAY, NOV 5, 2012
Ken makes a scene about a stage adaptation of Warrior Class for the BBC.
TUESDAY, OCT 16, 2012
Ken makes a scene about participating in Baltimore Center Stage's MY AMERICA PROJECT, directed by Hal Hartley
SUNDAY, JUL 29, 2012
Errol Louis makes a scene about Warrior Class on NY1's INSIDE CITY HALL
WEDNESDAY, JUL 25, 2012
Head critic for NYTimes makes a scene about Warrior Class on WQXR's Around Broadway.
TUESDAY, JUL 24, 2012
REVIEW: The Daily News makes a scene about Warrior Class
TUESDAY, JUL 24, 2012
REVIEW: The New York Times makes a scene about Warrior Class.
TUESDAY, JUL 24, 2012
REVIEW: Variety makes a scene about Warrior Class.
TUESDAY, JAN 24, 2012
Ken makes a scene about The Montgomery New's Review of FALLOW at People's Light and Theatre Company.
THURSDAY, JAN 19, 2012
Ken makes a scene about STAGE Magazine's review of FALLOW at People's Light and Theatre Company.
THURSDAY, DEC 1, 2011
Ken makes a scene about a remarkable piece of writing about the American theatre
TUESDAY, NOV 22, 2011
Ken makes a scene about a character's stage transformation
MONDAY, NOV 21, 2011
Ken makes a scene about WARRIOR CLASS online
TUESDAY, SEP 27, 2011
Ken makes a scene about the Asian American Performers Action Committee
MONDAY, SEP 26, 2011
Ken makes a scene about the fast work of SCR's casting department
FRIDAY, SEP 16, 2011
Ken makes a scene about Anne Garcia-Romero's post about LoNyLa
WEDNESDAY, JUL 6, 2011
Ken makes a scene about the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage's $150,000 grant to FALLOW
SUNDAY, JUN 19, 2011
A letter from Kaitlin Hopkins - Head of the Musical Theatre Program at Texas State
TUESDAY, FEB 15, 2011
Ken makes a scene about science plays.
WEDNESDAY, DEC 22, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Intelligence-Slave making the Houston Chronicles Top Theater Shows of 2010 list
TUESDAY, OCT 19, 2010
Ken makes a scene about intra out-group persecution.
WEDNESDAY, OCT 13, 2010
Ken makes a scene about why theater is not a humanity.
WEDNESDAY, OCT 6, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Athol Fugard's criticism about the failure of modern dramatists
MONDAY, JUL 26, 2010
Ken makes a scene about the diverse audience of Queens Theater in the Park
SUNDAY, JUN 6, 2010
Ken makes a scene about the Jewish Herald-Voice's profile of INTELLIGENCE-SLAVE
WEDNESDAY, JUN 2, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Lee Williams's review of Intelligence-Slave in the Houston Press
TUESDAY, JUN 1, 2010
Ken makes a scene about his Intelligence-Slave interview with culturemap.com
SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Everett Evans's review in the Houston Chronicle
TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010
Ken makes a scene about sharing a collective spirituality in the theater
SUNDAY, MAY 23, 2010
Ken makes a scene about seeing the bird through the feathers
FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010
Ken makes a scene about tech, letting go of the play and making discoveries in production
MONDAY, MAY 17, 2010
Ken makes a scene about INTELLIGENCE-SLAVE in the Houston Press
SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010
Ken makes a scene about INTELLIGENCE-SLAVE in the Houston Chronicle
THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2010
Ken makes a scene for the Alley Theatre's Mark Bly
WEDNESDAY, APR 21, 2010
Ken makes a scene about being playwright 151 in Adam Szymkowicz's blog.
THURSDAY, APR 8, 2010
Ken makes a scene about changing the name of his play.
THURSDAY, MAR 18, 2010
Ken makes a scene about pundits and why Tom Hanks is "injecting" racism into World War II.
TUESDAY, MAR 16, 2010
Ken makes a scene about writing "winning" dialogue.
MONDAY, MAR 15, 2010
Ken makes a scene about agents and the ecology of show business.
SATURDAY, MAR 13, 2010
Ken makes a scene about the beauty of the theater actor
THURSDAY, DEC 17, 2009
Ken makes a scene about non-English language productions
TUESDAY, NOV 17, 2009
Ken makes a scene about reviewing business books for theater artists
WEDNESDAY, NOV 4, 2009
Ken makes a scene about THE BIG REWRITE!
TUESDAY, OCT 27, 2009
Ken makes a scene about the discovery of an algorithm for happiness (7ZJJBYD9U6PX)
THURSDAY, OCT 22, 2009
Ken makes a scene about Holocaust fiction as a literary genre
TUESDAY, OCT 13, 2009
Ken makes a scene about Asians who don't go to the theater.
MONDAY, OCT 5, 2009
Ken makes a scene about the challenge of bravery in the theater.
MONDAY, SEP 28, 2009
Ken makes a scene about the death of Tragedy and Comedy.
TUESDAY, SEP 22, 2009
Ken makes a scene about Dave Matthews's statement that racism is "everywhere" in America.
WEDNESDAY, SEP 16, 2009
Ken makes a scene about why playwrights need websites.
End of Scene Blog

The Innovator's Dilemma Part II
Thursday, December 17, 2009
Bookmark and Share
Hello Readers! I apologize that it's been a month since my last post but a toasted hard-drive, some tv-land deadlines and the usual holiday madness has brought a gasping close to 2009. At any rate, here we are together again! If you don't hear from me before the new year, I wish you a happy and healthy 2010.

Okay, so on to Part II in my first installment of business book reviews for theater artists. (To read Part I, click here.) To recap, my first review is the MBA standard The Innovator's Dilemma. In this book, the author suggests that it is so difficult for successful organizations to be innovative because they must depart from already successful business practices to find new markets. Ultimately, failure to invest in "disruptive technologies" (technology that looks bad at first but then changes the landscape) causes their downfall.

How does this apply to the theater world? My contention in the previous blog post was that the disruptive technology that has the potential to change the game is non-English language theater. Now, before I continue I want to say that ultimately, this is an academic exercise. I know that there are many great theaters out there doing important bi-lingual work and this is not meant to be some grand complaint against the American Theater. Rather, this is an exercise in looking at what the business world is writing about and seeing how it applies to the theater.

In order for a disruptive technology to succeed, a number of ingredients need to be in place. 1 - The technology needs early adopters that are willing to pay a premium for it. 2 - The technology needs to be able to be developed broadly for new and innovative uses.

So, let's say the artistic directors of the world begin to program seasons with non-English language plays. What happens? Well, first off, these artistic directors can expect to alienate some of their audience. This is what always happens when a new technology is adopted. Old consumers who have invested in the technology aren't equipped to use it and will probably be ticked off that you are asking them to change. So, early adopters need to be there to bolster the technology while it evolves.

For the theater, these early adopters take the form of foundations and board members who are willing to underwrite non-English language productions. At first, this may seem like a burdensome endeavor for development departments that are already finding it hard enough to keep the lights on, but as a former fund-raiser, I know that nothing is more appealing to funders than a program that has a plausible method for a real goal.

Further, imagine the new funding streams that may open up. Aside from a non-English speaking audience that may arrive at a theaters doors, new donors may arrive as well. Development departments will have an excuse to approach donors they've never approached before. As our country becomes more and more diverse, the number of millionaires who speak English as a second language is growing as well. Non-English language programming will give a Director of Development an excuse to knock on their doors.

Now, let's say that new funders have supported a non-English language production. How can a theater make non-English language theater so vital that it changes the nature of the theater-going experience? To this, I would argue that everyone's world is becoming more multi-lingual. If theater is to speak to American society, it must become multi-lingual. Right now, my beloved New York Mets have an English language website AND a Spanish language website. The hit shows Heroes and Lost have portions that are subtitled. Operas are consistently subtitled. The Academy Awards have had a Best Foreign Film category for years. Are we in the theater, the most flexible of performance medium, going to concede cultural multi-multilingualism to Hollywood, opera and the Mets? Trust me, you don't want the Mets at the helm anything so important!

Our neighbors comes from places where they didn't grow up reading, Hansel and Gretel or learning Shakespeare in school. They grew up reading The Tiger, the Brahman and the Jackal or learning Calderon. We see people who speak English as a second language in our schools and our communities, isn't it important for them to have a place in our theater? Wouldn't we all be better for it? I'm telling you, there are millions of people who can find many, many new uses for multi-lingual/non-English language theater. Both my parents are college educated with Master's and my dad watched professional wrestling when he first came to America because that's what he could understand. People come to the United States and become Lakers fans in one generation. Why do we need to wait three generations before they become theater fans?

In preparations for Part III or this blog, I've contacted some translation schools around the country as well as some organizations that work with the UN, etc. I'll share some of what I've learned in Part III of this blog, which, hopefully will come before 2010!

end of scene
Bookmark and Share

Copyright © 2017 Kenneth K. Lin; All Rights Reserved.