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End Of Scene Blog Entries
SATURDAY, DEC 7, 2013
Ken makes a scene about why he wrote LIFE ON PAPER
FRIDAY, JUN 7, 2013
[EXCERPTED REVIEW] Broadway World makes a scene about Warrior Class at the Alley Theatre.
FRIDAY, JUN 7, 2013
[REVIEW] The Houston Press makes a scene about Warrior Class at the Alley Theatre.
SUNDAY, FEB 3, 2013
Ken makes a scene about an upcoming reading at Ensemble Studio Theatre
FRIDAY, FEB 1, 2013
Ken makes a scene about joining Season Two of House Of Cards
SATURDAY, DEC 8, 2012
Ken makes a scene about a letter from Liz Engelman
THURSDAY, DEC 6, 2012
Ken makes a scene about "Red State Blue State" on This American Life
MONDAY, NOV 5, 2012
Ken makes a scene about a stage adaptation of Warrior Class for the BBC.
TUESDAY, OCT 16, 2012
Ken makes a scene about participating in Baltimore Center Stage's MY AMERICA PROJECT, directed by Hal Hartley
SUNDAY, JUL 29, 2012
Errol Louis makes a scene about Warrior Class on NY1's INSIDE CITY HALL
WEDNESDAY, JUL 25, 2012
Head critic for NYTimes makes a scene about Warrior Class on WQXR's Around Broadway.
TUESDAY, JUL 24, 2012
REVIEW: The New York Times makes a scene about Warrior Class.
TUESDAY, JUL 24, 2012
REVIEW: The Daily News makes a scene about Warrior Class
TUESDAY, JUL 24, 2012
REVIEW: Variety makes a scene about Warrior Class.
TUESDAY, JAN 24, 2012
Ken makes a scene about The Montgomery New's Review of FALLOW at People's Light and Theatre Company.
THURSDAY, JAN 19, 2012
Ken makes a scene about STAGE Magazine's review of FALLOW at People's Light and Theatre Company.
THURSDAY, DEC 1, 2011
Ken makes a scene about a remarkable piece of writing about the American theatre
TUESDAY, NOV 22, 2011
Ken makes a scene about a character's stage transformation
MONDAY, NOV 21, 2011
Ken makes a scene about WARRIOR CLASS online
TUESDAY, SEP 27, 2011
Ken makes a scene about the Asian American Performers Action Committee
MONDAY, SEP 26, 2011
Ken makes a scene about the fast work of SCR's casting department
FRIDAY, SEP 16, 2011
Ken makes a scene about Anne Garcia-Romero's post about LoNyLa
WEDNESDAY, JUL 6, 2011
Ken makes a scene about the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage's $150,000 grant to FALLOW
SUNDAY, JUN 19, 2011
A letter from Kaitlin Hopkins - Head of the Musical Theatre Program at Texas State
TUESDAY, FEB 15, 2011
Ken makes a scene about science plays.
WEDNESDAY, DEC 22, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Intelligence-Slave making the Houston Chronicles Top Theater Shows of 2010 list
TUESDAY, OCT 19, 2010
Ken makes a scene about intra out-group persecution.
WEDNESDAY, OCT 13, 2010
Ken makes a scene about why theater is not a humanity.
WEDNESDAY, OCT 6, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Athol Fugard's criticism about the failure of modern dramatists
MONDAY, JUL 26, 2010
Ken makes a scene about the diverse audience of Queens Theater in the Park
SUNDAY, JUN 6, 2010
Ken makes a scene about the Jewish Herald-Voice's profile of INTELLIGENCE-SLAVE
WEDNESDAY, JUN 2, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Lee Williams's review of Intelligence-Slave in the Houston Press
TUESDAY, JUN 1, 2010
Ken makes a scene about his Intelligence-Slave interview with culturemap.com
SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Everett Evans's review in the Houston Chronicle
TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010
Ken makes a scene about sharing a collective spirituality in the theater
SUNDAY, MAY 23, 2010
Ken makes a scene about seeing the bird through the feathers
FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010
Ken makes a scene about tech, letting go of the play and making discoveries in production
MONDAY, MAY 17, 2010
Ken makes a scene about INTELLIGENCE-SLAVE in the Houston Press
SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010
Ken makes a scene about INTELLIGENCE-SLAVE in the Houston Chronicle
THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2010
Ken makes a scene for the Alley Theatre's Mark Bly
WEDNESDAY, APR 21, 2010
Ken makes a scene about being playwright 151 in Adam Szymkowicz's blog.
THURSDAY, APR 8, 2010
Ken makes a scene about changing the name of his play.
THURSDAY, MAR 18, 2010
Ken makes a scene about pundits and why Tom Hanks is "injecting" racism into World War II.
TUESDAY, MAR 16, 2010
Ken makes a scene about writing "winning" dialogue.
MONDAY, MAR 15, 2010
Ken makes a scene about agents and the ecology of show business.
SATURDAY, MAR 13, 2010
Ken makes a scene about the beauty of the theater actor
THURSDAY, DEC 17, 2009
Ken makes a scene about non-English language productions
TUESDAY, NOV 17, 2009
Ken makes a scene about reviewing business books for theater artists
WEDNESDAY, NOV 4, 2009
Ken makes a scene about THE BIG REWRITE!
TUESDAY, OCT 27, 2009
Ken makes a scene about the discovery of an algorithm for happiness (7ZJJBYD9U6PX)
THURSDAY, OCT 22, 2009
Ken makes a scene about Holocaust fiction as a literary genre
TUESDAY, OCT 13, 2009
Ken makes a scene about Asians who don't go to the theater.
MONDAY, OCT 5, 2009
Ken makes a scene about the challenge of bravery in the theater.
MONDAY, SEP 28, 2009
Ken makes a scene about the death of Tragedy and Comedy.
TUESDAY, SEP 22, 2009
Ken makes a scene about Dave Matthews's statement that racism is "everywhere" in America.
WEDNESDAY, SEP 16, 2009
Ken makes a scene about why playwrights need websites.
End of Scene Blog

The Process of Progress
Tuesday, October 27, 2009
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This past weekend, I attended a college friend's wedding and here we all were, thrown together again and at one point, one of my friends turned to me and said, "Hey, have you seen what a good place Susan is in? I've never seen her feeling so good about life." Granted, my best friends in life are a motley crew of certifiable lunatics, but Susan always seemed to be haunted by troubles that we could never understand. Now, almost ten years after college, Susan seems to be turning a corner. This made us happy and it reminded me of an article in The Atlantic that I've been meaning to share with you. It is entitled "What Makes Us Happy?"

The article focuses on the work of a Harvard Professor named George Vaillant who committed to a longitudinal study of happiness in an attempt to discover an algorithm for a well-lived life. He tracked a group of Harvard students (including President Kennedy) and followed them throughout their lives measuring markers of well-being such as substance-abuse and depression, etc. The article is amazing, because Vaillant found that a person who seemed incredibly well-adjusted in young adulthood had as much a chance of unhappiness in late adulthood as a seemingly maladjusted young man had of finding happiness later in life. This flies in the face of the conventional wisdom that past results are the best indicator of future results. What was happening?

Well, the study seems to indicate that happiness is not necessarily an endpoint, but rather a continual work in progress. A well-lived life is a process in which progress is not impeded. It is a life where demons and afflictions become lessons and tools. Every person goes through dark times. Where those difficult times happen, chronologically, is variable. The happy person goes through the dark times and keeps pushing forward, emerging wiser for the experience.

I find this study to be very inspiring when I begin to flagellate myself for not taking better advantage of certain opportunities or when I feel like I'm still foundering and struggling with personal demons. I've come to see that as long as I'm not getting stuck, I am living a well-lived life and this thought makes me happy. If I do get stuck, I remind myself that I don't always have to be stuck. So, for all you, likewise, struggling writers out there, just remember, where you are today is not necessarily where you are going to be tomorrow. Some of your peers may appear light years ahead of you, but life is a process in which everyone must encounter trials. Stick around long enough and your time will come. Just keep moving forward ... whatever forward means to you. If you've got something to say, don't ever give up. The muses are pulling for you.

Incidentally, this notion of the power of progress has been very inspiring for my work. It's easy to be cynical and focus on all the ways in which the time we live in is so bad, but the truth is that mankind has made incredible advancements. We are living longer, more productive lives. Slavery is "considered" illegal and unacceptable in nearly every corner of the globe. Caste systems are being replaced by more egalitarian societies. Researchers found that people who reported feelings of deep, unabashed racism in 1950's America later reported an ardent belief that racism was "wrong" in the 1970's. Not all is peaches and roses, but people can and do change. The world can and does change. Who is to say that our generation is not going to be the one that ends poverty? That elects a woman to the office of President? That ends genocide? That treats gay people as fully enfranchised members of society? I get scared and sad when certain elements in our society ask us to swallow a lie that progress is an abandonment of time-honored ideals.

Now, it's important for me that this blog doesn't become some liberal screed that serves to attack everyone on the Right. (My hard-working immigrant parents are Republicans and their reasons for being-so are well-formed.) Rather, this blog is designed to broadcast a message that there is hope in progress. In the span of four generations, my family has engaged with nearly every swing of the political pendulum. My great-grandparents became opium addicts when they were preyed upon by capitalist Englishmen. My grandmother's siblings were executed by Communists during the Cultural Revolution. Chased by xenophobic sentiments, my parents traced a journey from China to Burma to Hong Kong to Taiwan to Argentina to the United States. Here, they struggled to make themselves a part of the American story and, despite culture-shock, communications barriers, overt-racism and what sociologists term, "micro-aggression" (a low-level, ever-present form of racial oppression), have raised a son who has become an American cultural mouth-piece. My life's journey is a testament to progress and the fact that danger lies at either ends of the political spectrum, where radical men and ideas take advantage of people who are hopeless and stuck in the miasma of their own existence.

As artists, we have to be there to provide hope. I believe that our mandate is to grease the wheels of progress, to help our neighbors to continue to believe in each other and a better future. We are the panacea to the cycle of bad thoughts and behavior that always threatens to bog down our society. May we inspire the process of progress.

end of scene

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