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End Of Scene Blog Entries
SATURDAY, DEC 7, 2013
Ken makes a scene about why he wrote LIFE ON PAPER
FRIDAY, JUN 7, 2013
[EXCERPTED REVIEW] Broadway World makes a scene about Warrior Class at the Alley Theatre.
FRIDAY, JUN 7, 2013
[REVIEW] The Houston Press makes a scene about Warrior Class at the Alley Theatre.
SUNDAY, FEB 3, 2013
Ken makes a scene about an upcoming reading at Ensemble Studio Theatre
FRIDAY, FEB 1, 2013
Ken makes a scene about joining Season Two of House Of Cards
SATURDAY, DEC 8, 2012
Ken makes a scene about a letter from Liz Engelman
THURSDAY, DEC 6, 2012
Ken makes a scene about "Red State Blue State" on This American Life
MONDAY, NOV 5, 2012
Ken makes a scene about a stage adaptation of Warrior Class for the BBC.
TUESDAY, OCT 16, 2012
Ken makes a scene about participating in Baltimore Center Stage's MY AMERICA PROJECT, directed by Hal Hartley
SUNDAY, JUL 29, 2012
Errol Louis makes a scene about Warrior Class on NY1's INSIDE CITY HALL
WEDNESDAY, JUL 25, 2012
Head critic for NYTimes makes a scene about Warrior Class on WQXR's Around Broadway.
TUESDAY, JUL 24, 2012
REVIEW: The Daily News makes a scene about Warrior Class
TUESDAY, JUL 24, 2012
REVIEW: The New York Times makes a scene about Warrior Class.
TUESDAY, JUL 24, 2012
REVIEW: Variety makes a scene about Warrior Class.
TUESDAY, JAN 24, 2012
Ken makes a scene about The Montgomery New's Review of FALLOW at People's Light and Theatre Company.
THURSDAY, JAN 19, 2012
Ken makes a scene about STAGE Magazine's review of FALLOW at People's Light and Theatre Company.
THURSDAY, DEC 1, 2011
Ken makes a scene about a remarkable piece of writing about the American theatre
TUESDAY, NOV 22, 2011
Ken makes a scene about a character's stage transformation
MONDAY, NOV 21, 2011
Ken makes a scene about WARRIOR CLASS online
TUESDAY, SEP 27, 2011
Ken makes a scene about the Asian American Performers Action Committee
MONDAY, SEP 26, 2011
Ken makes a scene about the fast work of SCR's casting department
FRIDAY, SEP 16, 2011
Ken makes a scene about Anne Garcia-Romero's post about LoNyLa
WEDNESDAY, JUL 6, 2011
Ken makes a scene about the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage's $150,000 grant to FALLOW
SUNDAY, JUN 19, 2011
A letter from Kaitlin Hopkins - Head of the Musical Theatre Program at Texas State
TUESDAY, FEB 15, 2011
Ken makes a scene about science plays.
WEDNESDAY, DEC 22, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Intelligence-Slave making the Houston Chronicles Top Theater Shows of 2010 list
TUESDAY, OCT 19, 2010
Ken makes a scene about intra out-group persecution.
WEDNESDAY, OCT 13, 2010
Ken makes a scene about why theater is not a humanity.
WEDNESDAY, OCT 6, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Athol Fugard's criticism about the failure of modern dramatists
MONDAY, JUL 26, 2010
Ken makes a scene about the diverse audience of Queens Theater in the Park
SUNDAY, JUN 6, 2010
Ken makes a scene about the Jewish Herald-Voice's profile of INTELLIGENCE-SLAVE
WEDNESDAY, JUN 2, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Lee Williams's review of Intelligence-Slave in the Houston Press
TUESDAY, JUN 1, 2010
Ken makes a scene about his Intelligence-Slave interview with culturemap.com
SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010
Ken makes a scene about Everett Evans's review in the Houston Chronicle
TUESDAY, MAY 25, 2010
Ken makes a scene about sharing a collective spirituality in the theater
SUNDAY, MAY 23, 2010
Ken makes a scene about seeing the bird through the feathers
FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2010
Ken makes a scene about tech, letting go of the play and making discoveries in production
MONDAY, MAY 17, 2010
Ken makes a scene about INTELLIGENCE-SLAVE in the Houston Press
SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010
Ken makes a scene about INTELLIGENCE-SLAVE in the Houston Chronicle
THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2010
Ken makes a scene for the Alley Theatre's Mark Bly
WEDNESDAY, APR 21, 2010
Ken makes a scene about being playwright 151 in Adam Szymkowicz's blog.
THURSDAY, APR 8, 2010
Ken makes a scene about changing the name of his play.
THURSDAY, MAR 18, 2010
Ken makes a scene about pundits and why Tom Hanks is "injecting" racism into World War II.
TUESDAY, MAR 16, 2010
Ken makes a scene about writing "winning" dialogue.
MONDAY, MAR 15, 2010
Ken makes a scene about agents and the ecology of show business.
SATURDAY, MAR 13, 2010
Ken makes a scene about the beauty of the theater actor
THURSDAY, DEC 17, 2009
Ken makes a scene about non-English language productions
TUESDAY, NOV 17, 2009
Ken makes a scene about reviewing business books for theater artists
WEDNESDAY, NOV 4, 2009
Ken makes a scene about THE BIG REWRITE!
TUESDAY, OCT 27, 2009
Ken makes a scene about the discovery of an algorithm for happiness (7ZJJBYD9U6PX)
THURSDAY, OCT 22, 2009
Ken makes a scene about Holocaust fiction as a literary genre
TUESDAY, OCT 13, 2009
Ken makes a scene about Asians who don't go to the theater.
MONDAY, OCT 5, 2009
Ken makes a scene about the challenge of bravery in the theater.
MONDAY, SEP 28, 2009
Ken makes a scene about the death of Tragedy and Comedy.
TUESDAY, SEP 22, 2009
Ken makes a scene about Dave Matthews's statement that racism is "everywhere" in America.
WEDNESDAY, SEP 16, 2009
Ken makes a scene about why playwrights need websites.
End of Scene Blog

Welcome to end of scene!
Wednesday, September 16, 2009
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Welcome to the first installment of end of scene, a weblog intended to be a resource about my work and my views on the American theater. For those of you who are interested in finding out more about what I'm up to as a dramatist, I'll be posting news and updates about me and my work. These updates will include press, musing and excerpts from work in progress. In the future, I intend to post pages from the projects that I'm currently working on and you'll be able to track these works from inception to revision to completion.

For those of you who find yourselves on the outside-looking-in on the strange and unusual beast that is the entertainment industry, I hope that you will find this blog helpful as you move along your path in this world. I come from a blue-collar immigrant family. English is my second language. Growing up, I didn't know anyone who would even dream of taking a shot at entertainment industry. But, thanks to some luck, some hard work and some great teachers I find myself a professional playwright and screenwriter. So, as the occasion permits, I'll share my thoughts about breaking in and grad school and agents, etc. Further, I'll also share writing lessons/exercises that I've developed and taught in various master classes over the past few years. As this blog progresses, feel free to treat it as a resource and send in questions. I'll do my best to find the answers for you.

As this is the first installment of this blog, I think it apropos to begin by having a discussion about why I created this site. To be sure, it make sense on a professional level to have a nifty way for people to get to know you and your work. But, increasingly, I think it's important for every playwright to have a webpage as a means of evolving the form and developing a more meaningful dialogue with the audience. I started thinking about all of this when I read a great article in The New Yorker by Tad Friend entitled "The Cobra: Inside a movie marketer's playbook." Now, aside from the fact that "The Cobra" is a terrible way to market this particular article, the article is a fascinating study on how Hollywood has taken movie critics out of its business model. In film, the critics aren't kingmakers. The affect of a positive review on selling tickets is negligible. "Most critics are not the target audience for most of the films being made today," the article cites Clint Culpeper a marketer for Sony Screen Gems as saying, "How a fifty-six-year-old man feels about a movie aimed at teen-age girls is irrelevant."

Critics irrelevant?! I had to read more. According to the article, in very basic terms, when deciding whether or not to green-light a film, studios consider the market segments the film will appeal to. These segments are: men under 25; older men; women under 25; older women. If a film doesn't hit at least two of these segments, it doesn't get made. Of all these segments only older women read and are influenced by movie reviews. Since that's only 25%, movie studios essentially ignore reviewers completely when making their decisions and thus, reviewers play a very minor role in shaping audiences.

How does Hollywood compensate and find ways to reach the segment that will respond to a particular film in its catalogue of offerings? They spend tons and tons of money communicating through expensive marketing campaigns. When you see a 30-second trailer staring Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, coupled with billboards, novelty mugs at Burger King and promotional interviews, the marketers are having a dialogue with you that draws upon every movie you've seen with these stars, every novelty mug you've ever bought at Burger King and, to a significant degree, the zeitgeist. Moreover, they are promising a certain level of quality at a relatively meager cost.

Theaters don't have the luxury of this kind of mass market campaigning/dialogue, so they are forced to rely more heavily on reviews and the relatively large readerships of newspapers (though those are fast dwindling). This makes theater a risky proposition for the average theater goer. Sure, if you're an avid theater-goer, you know the reputations of the various theaters and you might even know theater actors or directors or playwrights. But, this level of knowledge requires an active zeal for the form that pushes theater-going yet another step further into wonkishness. Most people don't know this shorthand. For the average person to see a play now, they need to shell out fairly big bucks to see something whose quality is a relative unknown. So, they often pick movies even though a great live performance of a great play kicks a movie's ass any day. It's like going to a foreign country and choosing between a hole in the wall greasy spoon and McDonald's. I can't really blame people for being protective of their GI tracts if they know nothing more than the vague aromas that are floating out the establishments.

So, I've created this site, in part, for the people who are considering seeing my plays. For all you brave souls that are considering shelling out some hard earned dollars and dragging out a companion who will hold you responsible for ruining his or her evening, I want you to know what you're getting into. I want you to know about my artistic philosophies and what I'm trying to talk about when you sit before one of my plays. I want you to have an understanding of my work within the context of my other work so you can get a sense of the greater dialogue that I'm trying to have with you and the world. In the 'works' section of the website, I will publish the first act of any play that you might potentially see, so you can decide if it's something you're interested in and I'll do my best to keep this blog as up to date as possible.

Incidentally, I did do some additional digging, because I was wondering if the current Hollywood marketing machine is causing people to miss out on movies they would otherwise enjoy. It turns out that reviews by professional critics are not very good a predicting an average movie-goers actual enjoyment of a film. According to a post on the blog of the British Psychological Study, "If you want to know whether you're going to enjoy a movie, the opinion of professional film critics might not be the best place to find out." A study by researchers at Indiana University has shown that there is a direct and positive relationship with the amount of film a person watches and the harshness of their critique. So, if you do not watch as many movies as a professional reviewer you can assume that you and she are not of the same mind. If you do watch as many movies as the professional reviewer ... well, why are you reading reviews anyway? You know your own mind, right?

end of scene
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