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Production Images
Fallow Click here to see Aaron Hayes's transformation from Cornell Sophmore to Migrant Farm Worker.
Research Materials

Bishop, Holley. Robbing the Bees: A biography of honey, the sweet liquid gold that seduced the world. Free Press: New York, 2005.

Goldfarb, Ronald L. Migrant Farm Workers: A caste of despair. Iowa State University Press: Ames, 1981.

Horn, Tammy. Bees in America: How the honey bee shaped a nation. The University Press of Kentucky: Lexington, 2005.

McWilliams, Carey. Factories In the Field: The story of migratory farm labor in California. University of California Press: Berkeley, 1935.

Nahmias, Rick, photographer. The Migrant Project: comptemporary California farm workers. University of New Mexico Press: Albuquerque, 2008.

Walker, Richard A. The Conquest of Bread. 150 years of agribusiness in California. The New Press: New York, 2004.

Weiler, Michael. Bees and Honey: from flower to jar. Floris Books: Edinburgh, 2006.

Wells, Mirian. Strawberry Fields: politics, class, and work in California agriculture. Cornell University Press: Ithaca, 1996.

http://www.meetup.com/nyc-beekeeping-meetup/

www.themigrantproject.com

Fallow

Read Fallow (.pdf)

Synopsis:

Fallow tells the story of Aaron Hayes, a well-heeled young American who casts off his Ivy-League pedigree when a summer job as a bee-keeper turns into a journey through the American heartland as a migrant farm worker. His journey ends in California where he is mistaken as Mexican by White Supremacists who beat him to death in a hate crime. The play follows Aaron's transformation as he travels from farm to farm and his mother Elizabeth's, transformation as she journeys, in a gypsy cab, to meet her son's killers. Ultimately, they trace similar paths of discovery, longing, hope and grief.

Awards/Production History:

  • Commissioned by Arena Stage, Washington, D.C.
  • Developed at the Lark New Play Development Center's Playground Initiative

Notes:

This copyrighted material is intended for your personal use. It cannot be used without the express written permission of the author. All rights reserved.

For professional inquiries, please contact Christopher Till at Creative Artists Agency.

Copyright © 2017 Kenneth K. Lin; All Rights Reserved.